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diffusers

Homemakers are using this old but little-known technique to keep their homes smelling lovely, to beat stress and add a unique aspect to entertaining guests. Know all about diffusers and their many benefits.

As certain colors have a specific impact on the psyche, certain smells do this too. According to aromatherapists, some scents invigorate, others soothe and calm the senses, and some even have a healing impact on the body. Even for reasons other than therapy or stress busting, filling your home with lovely natural fragrances such as citrus, lavender, jasmine, sandalwood, lemon grass and so on can be a great idea. Diffusers are an easy and natural way to fill your home with lovely fragrances. You would have seen these in the fancier hotels and restaurants. They are also quite readily available and easy to use on a daily or occasional basis.

A bit about diffusers and types of diffusers

A diffuser is a device that helps spread fragrance using essential oils. There are heat diffusers that use candles or tea lights to spread the fragrance. They can be used in any part of the home. There are reed diffusers that work by the special reeds soaking up fragrance and spreading it around. These don’t need heat and continue to release a mild fragrance. There are other types of diffusers such as nebulizers and ultrasonic diffusers, but heat diffusers and reed diffusers are a natural, easily available and affordable option for us Indians.

How to use diffusers

To use a heat diffuser, you will need a diffuser that has a hollow area to keep a candle or tea light with a fixed or detachable shallow bowl on top. You will also need tea lights and fragrant oil – preferably essential oils. Tea lights are very easily available offline as well as online; Amazon, eBay and other stores have a wide selection. You can opt for the better quality of essential oils from brands such as Blossom Kochar, Khadi and so on, or you can get a combination pack of oils with lovely scents such as rose, citronella, peppermint, eucalyptus, etc.

Fill the bowl at the top of the diffuser with water and add a few drops of the scented oil. Light the candle or tea-light and insert it below. As the water heats up and evaporates, the fragrance will spread around the entire room and even waft into the adjoining rooms.

To use a reed diffuser, all you have to do is add the oil to the provided container and insert the reeds. When the oil evaporates (usually in a few days) you can add more oil. So a reed diffuser is a great option for when you need constant fragrance but don’t want the hassle of lighting and looking after a candle. Reed diffusers are great for the washroom or the lobby. They need no looking after and disperse a mild steady fragrance.

More tips for using diffusers

You can use a diffuser all the time or on special occasions. If you meditate or do yoga, a diffuser can really help enhance the entire experience. The sight of the candle flame and the beautiful aroma improves the mood and helps you concentrate.

If you’ve invited guests over for dinner, this is a great time to use a diffuser. It helps dissipate the cooking smells that are bound to be present. Your guests are greeted with a lovely fragrance. The smell coupled with the flickering flame and perhaps some mood music can create a wonderful, welcoming atmosphere. It is best to keep the lights muted. Yellow light is best: perhaps some accent lighting from table lamps and focus lights? Certainly avoid the harsh, unflattering glare of tube lights!

Experiment with fragrances to see what you like; you can even create mixtures of your own. Great idea for the next time you have guests, wouldn’t you say?

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Sarika Periwal is a writer and entrepreneur with a love for the outdoors and taking the untrodden path. Run-of-the-mill simply doesn't do it for her. When she's not in front of her computer, she's probably out there scaling some mountain. Fueled by a hunger to know more, she devours the written word. She lives by the words - 'If it ain't tough, it ain't worth doing!'